Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opposition in republican ranks, he pulled it, and sent the house home for the holiday. reid charged today politics explained why the speaker had not yet called the house back. >> john boehner seems to care more about keeping his speakership than keeping the nation on a firm financial footing. it's obvious what's going on. he's waiting until january 3 to get reelected to speaker before he gets serious about negotiations. >> warner: a boenhner spokesman shot back, "harry reid should talk less and legislate more." but late today,
the latest on the chances for a breakthrough-- just four days before automatic tax hikes and spending cuts hit. >> brown: then, we turn to india. ray suarez looks at the violent protests and public anger sparked by the gang rape of a young woman. >> warner: john merrow has the story of a group of california charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at >> and with the ongoi
of the year when people are making their decisions about whether they're going to get tax breaks or who they're going to give to. are people looking at the fiscal cliff and saying "i don't know"? >> absolutely. people are uncertain as to whether there's going to be a charitable deduction next year, things like the estate tax will change. so it's a rocky time. so some people are giving more and deciding "i'm going to get the tax break now and do it while it's a good thing for sure" and some people are putting off the decision deciding they isle give more later. so we're seeing a mixed bag but it's a tough time because this is the time of year when most people are doing a lot of charitable giving. >> ifill: let me get your name right this time, jackie, and ask you about federal employees. they are affected by this. there are furloughs, cutbacks, tell me what people are thinking. >> well, federal employees are in the unuely bad position of facing peril regardless of whether there's a deal. or whether sequestration and the fiscal cliff occurs. >> ifill: the across-the-board cuts. why does it wor
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)